No matter what path of our amazing planet you take, hiking life is pretty much the same in every part of the globe. Dehydration, blisters, bad weather are just a few of the most common hiking struggles that we all face occasionally. But all these struggles are outweighed by many joys and benefits of hiking. These comics capture both sides of hiking life.

‘Boots McFarland’ is the pseudonym of the talented adventurer and hiker, Geolyn Carvin. Geolyn started the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) in 2002 and hiked the trail in sections. She completed the trail after 13 years, in 2015. Boots McFarland was her name on the PCT.

Boots McFarland cartoons are inspired by Geolyn’s years on the PCT but it’s not difficult for an average hiker to relate to the ridiculous situations depicted in her single panel cartoons. We have all experienced many of these situations, but Geolyn has found the way to document them in the unique and brilliantly humorous way.

“I’d say 90% of the ideas are from personal experiences or friends experiences,” Carvin told Shoulders of Giants. “There’s very little fiction. I’m sure that’s why most everyone can relate because these are real situations and observations.”

Geolyn lives in California and she is also a musician. She works at a company that manufactures ultralight shelters called TarpTent and enjoys spending her free time outdoors.

You can find her cartoons here:

Facebook: Boots McFarland Cartoon

Website: http://bootsmcfarland.com

Instagram: http://instagram.com/boots.mcfarland/

Here are some of our favorite Boots McFarland cartoons.

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Image source: Boots McFarland Facebook page
Boots McFarland
Image source: Boots McFarland Facebook page
Boots McFarland
Image source: Boots McFarland Facebook page
Boots McFarland
Image source: Boots McFarland Facebook page
Boots McFarland
Image source: Boots McFarland Facebook page

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One thought

  1. Somehow I missed one of the comics before, “Good thing we’re American. It’s only 7.7 miles instead of 12.4 km,” which I can definitely relate to because we are Americans that hike in Europe often. My husband refuses to talk in miles, and I refuse to deal with kilometers.

    Like

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